Marianela Medrano, Ph.D. in Conversation with David Kopacz, MD & Anjana Deshpande, MBA, LCSW

It was a pleasure to have this conversation with Marianela Medrano and Anjana Deshpande. The conversation ranged across topics of post-traumatic growth, creativity, resilience, and vulnerability.

You can watch the video of the conversation here

For more information about the discussants:

Marianela Medrano, PhD: Palabra Counseling and Training Center

Marianela Medrano, PhD

Anjana Deshpande, MBA, LCSW: Write Thought

Anjana Deshpande, MBA, LCSW

Marianela said we might have a follow-up conversation, so stay tuned!

Coniunctionis: Truma, Transformation & Punk Rock

Mental Contagion is publishing online some of its archive. Coniunctionis: Trauma, Transformation & Punk Rock was a column that I wrote from 2000 – 2002. My sister, Karen Kopacz started editing and publishing Mental Contagion and brought together a great group of writers, including Gene Dillon, Wendy Lewis, Dean Pajevic, and Eric Hoffman, as well as many others over the years.

I wrote a new introduction for this collection of essays and I’ll let it speak for itself as you can find it below along with the table of contents. You can download the complete archive through this link. I also have the individual essays on my website under the Creativity section.

CONIUNCTIONIS

Trauma, Transformation & Punk Rock

(2000 – 2002)

David R. Kopacz, MD

Table of Contents

.0  :    Introduction

.1  :     Why Coniunctionis? (November, 2000)

.2  :    Is Reality Real? (I) (December, 2000)

.3  :     Is Reality Real?  (II) (January, 2001)

.4  :     How Can Ugliness and Disharmony, Which Are the Content of Tragic Myth [and punk rock], Inspire Esthetic Delight?” (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part I) (February, 2001)

.5  :     Why is Revolt Necessary? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part II) (March, 2001)

.6  :    Is Alienation Necessary for Creativity? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part III) (April, 2001)

.7  :      Is There an Inside/Outside? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part IV) (May, 2001)

.8  :     What is the Meaning of Ian Curtis’ Death?  Where is the line between the Art Object and the Artist? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part V) (June, 2001)

.9  :     What is Punk Rock? What is Not Punk Rock? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part VI) (July, 2001)

.10:     What Does the Shadow Know? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part VII) (August, 2001)

.11:      What is the Relationship Between Music and Religion? (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part VIII) (September, 2001)

.12:      What Are We to Do? Quotations (October, 2001)

I:          Interview: Ouroboros (Houston) by David Kopacz – for Mental Contagion (MC) (November, 2001)

.13:      What Does Religion have to do with Rock? A review of Dan Graham’s Rock My Religion (December, 2001)

.14:     What Did You See There? Ian Curtis and the Visionary Quest of the Shaman (Joy Division, Punk Rock, Violence, Despair & Transformation Part IX) (January, 2002)

I:          Interview: Poster Children by David Kopacz (With Special Guests Doug McCarver and Mike Barry) (February 2002)

.15:     Afterwords

CONIUNCTIONIS.0

On stranger waves, the lows and highs Our vision touched the sky. “A Means to an End,” Joy Division, Closer, 1980.

There is a movement within me, a current and flow that lives through me. I have felt the pull to be inside, where everything is happening. I have felt the pull to be outside of it all, where nothing is happening. These essays, written between 2000-2002 for the online journal Mental Contagion, are attempts to understand the inside and the outside and the power that flows from outside to inside and from inside to outside. These essays are investigations into the nature of reality through Joy Division, trauma, transformation, and punk rock. 

There is a pull that some people feel, to go deeply inward, sometimes that pull is a push, from alienation or trauma in the outer world. Going into this inner wilderness is a kind of darkness and it can overlap with despair. Maybe despair is the cause of the inwardness or maybe despair is a station along the path of inwardness, like a phase of grief that one goes through, leaving the communal and collective world and entering into the sacred inner cave of consciousness and being. Jung wrote,

“As a child I felt myself to be alone, and I am still, because I know things and must hint at things which others apparently know nothing of, and for the most part do not want to know. Loneliness does not come from having no people about one, but from being unable to communicate the things that seem important to oneself, or from holding certain views which others find inadmissible. The loneliness began with the experiences of my early dreams, and reached its climax at the time I was working on the unconscious. . . . It is important to have a secret, a premonition of things unknown. If fills life with something impersonal, a numinosum,” (Carl Jung, Memories, Dreams, Reflections, 356).

For Jung, this loneliness was difficult to bear, but it was a source of learning and experience that he would not have traded for fitting in. Ian Curtis, the lead singer of Joy Division, also found a creativity in the darkness and the loneliness and he sent back missives from the depths, as a lone astronaut exploring space might send back scratchy transmissions from another galaxy:

“You’ve been seeking things in darkness, not in learning(No Love Lost)

“I’ve been waiting for a guide to come and take me by the hand. Could these sensation make me feel the pleasures of a normal man?These sensations barely interest me for another day I’ve got the spirit, lose the feeling, take the shock away” (Disorder)

Depending on how this pull is engaged in, one goes on an inner journey. If one goes deep enough, there is an inner well of transformation, drinking that water of the deep self is like a form of rebirth, but rebirth infers that there has been a death. Without guidance, many are lost on this path and there is untold loss of human potential. Yet, these brave souls, these inner warriors, can serve as heroes as well as cautionary tales. To give one’s self over to this inner secret is like taking the steps of what Joseph Campbell called the “Hero’s Journey,” with steps of 1) separating from the everyday world; 2) entering into a magical world or the underworld and going through an initiation and transformation into a new way of being; and 3) a return and reintegration into society. Jung’s process of individuation would say that the hero brings back energy and ideas from the collective unconscious, and yet the hero bringing this back is alone, because no one else made that journey and no one else yet understands the beauty and value of what the hero or heroine has brought back from the unconscious into the light of day. Joseph Campbell felt that the hero is rejected by society, because he or she has gone places that most people do not know or understand. Herman Hesse, in Steppenwolf, wrote of a similar concept, that creativity is infused into society by the lone wolf, the liminal being, the misfit.

“We are psychiatrists; we are German; we have read Nietzsche; we know that to gaze too long at monsters is to risk becoming one – that is what we get paid for,” (Huelsenbeck, quoted in Greil Marcus, Lipstick Traces, 226).

I was a young psychiatrist when I was writing these columns and I was trying to find my path as an artist, a writer, a professional and a person. I was not German, but I had read Nietzsche, Jung, and a number of other writers you’ll find in these pages. I had listened to Joy Division and punk rock and post-punk. I was gazing at monsters, both inner and outer, as Richard Huelsenbeck, the Dadaist Psychiatrist.

These essays were about me trying to figure some things out, but they are really more explorations than answers. Over the years, the topics in these essays have resurfaced and recurred in my life in various ways. After a period of some years, I found that I had more to write on these topics and began writing additional columns.

For the purpose of this archival collection, I have just collected those essays published in Mental Contagion 2000 – 2002. Post 9/11/2001, I mostly shifted to doing interviews for the column, for this collection I have kept just a few interviews as many of them seem more specific to that time and that place (Champain-Urbana, Illinois). You can read more recent Coniunctionis essays on my blog Being Fully Human. My website www.davidkopacz.com also has the original Coniunctionis essays, along with artwork, photography, poetry, publications, and other work. The work of Coniunctionis prefigures my current work with Joseph Rael (Beautiful Painted Arrow) and has continued to influence my writing and published work:

Re-humanizing Medicine: A Holistic Framework for Transforming Your Self, Your Practice and the Culture of Medicine (2014)

Walking the Medicine Wheel: Healing Trauma & PTSD (2016) with Joseph Rael (Beautiful Painted Arrow)

Becoming Medicine: Pathways of Initiation into a Living Spirituality (2020) with Joseph Rael (Beautiful Painted Arrow)


The Call/The Invitation: Podcast (Part III) with Suzanne Richman, David Kopacz & Beth Turner

Part III of the Transformative Language Arts Network podcast

Sun Through Tree near Sol Duc River (D. Kopacz, 2020)

The Call/The Invitation Part III

David and Suzanne continue their moving discussion around ‘doing better than rushing to return to normal’ after things shift once again with COVID 19.

This episode dwells in the land of opportunity: What could things look like for us as a people, a world, an environment should we thoughtfully, purposefully move with the new things ushered in despite the chaos vs desperately trying to ‘get back’ to what was once upon a time—back then?

There is such beauty in their words!

I will borrow a saying from David: “Like  pinatas of wisdom…”

Listen to the podcast here

——————-

David Kopacz is an author, painter, TLA member and psychiatrist. He lives in Seattle, WA.

Twitter: @davidkopaczmd

Blog: https://beingfullyhuman.com/

Website: https://www.davidkopacz.com/

Instagram: davidkopaczmd

———————

Suzanne Richman is an education consultant, had founding roles within Goddard College in Vermont, she has expertise and passions within the realms of trauma, grief, social activism. She is a self-confessed recovering academic. You can contact Suzanne at :   Suzannehummingbird@gmail.com.

The Call/The Invitation: Podcast (Part II) with Suzanne Richman, David Kopacz & Beth Turner

This is part II of the Transformative Language Arts Network podcast.

Binding Sites of Coronavirus COVID-19 (D. Kopacz, 2020)

The Call/The Invitation, Part II

David and Suzanne do some wrestling for us in this episode: 

The push to ‘return to normal’ after a stretch of chaos. 

*What could we miss as a people, a nation, a world? 

*What questions could we be asking of ourselves right now, and one another? 

*What gems could be squandered if we skip past this pause before the return?

Their thoughts will cause you to slow your pace and move ahead with more intention and quite possibly in a different direction.

Listening to them share is very centering.  And probably something you will want to repeat!

Enjoy~

You can listen to Part II of the podcast here

————————————————–

David Kopacz is a psychiatrist, a painter and an author. He lives in Seattle where he does transformation work with veterans and their stories. He is a TLA member.

Twitter: @davidkopaczmd

Blog: https://beingfullyhuman.com/

Website: https://www.davidkopacz.com/

Instagram: davidkopaczmd

————————–

Suzanne Richman is a passionate teacher within such realms as: Ethnobotany, Social and Ecological Medicine, Community Health Systems, Trauma and Transformational Leadership. She lives in Vermont, and is a TLA member. Suzannehummingbird@gmail.com.

Review of Walking the Medicine Wheel by Michael H. Cohen

Thank you to Michael H. Cohen for his kind and thoughtful review of Walking the Medicine Wheel: Healing Trauma & PTSD. You can read the entire review here. A few excerpts below.

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CAN INDIGENOUS HEALING SYSTEMS RESOLVE COMPLEX, MODERN CLINICAL PROBLEMS SUCH AS TRAUMA AND PTSD?

“Answering this question, as part of a larger inquiry into integrative medicine, psychiatrist and integrative physician David Kopacz, and Native American visionary Joseph Rael (Beautiful Painted Arrow), have written Walking the Medicine Wheel: Healing Trauma & PTSD.”

“Importantly, the book notes that ‘the real importance of ceremony is that we are not just going through meaningless motions, but that our motions are full of deep meaning, our motions are the motions of creation.’

Healing not only helps the person – it changes the cosmos.

That is why this is such an important book. Walking the Medicine Wheel shares wisdom from two divergent traditions—one clinical and the other focused on healing through imagery, sound, poetry, introspection, visioning. The quest is nothing less than clearing the fog of the aftermath of war, instilling sacredness, and reclaiming the whole self.”